Filter Press Frequently Asked Questions

Here is a list of questions about our filter presses that we commonly receive.  The answers offer general guidelines.  For answers specific to your application and process, call our professional service staff at 800.245.3006.  They can quickly and reliably answer all your technical questions.  We look forward to serving you.

PROCESS
1. How long will it take to fill my filter press/how long should the cycle time be on my filter press?
2. What’s the best filter cloth for my process?
3. How can I tell what kind of cloth I have?
4. What micron size are my filter cloths?
5. What size feed pump do I need for my press?
6. How do I size my compressor for my press feed pump and air blow?
7. I changed polymer (or chemical treatment type) and now I get sloppy cakes.  What do I do?
8. My press is dropping sloppy cakes and I think that my cloths are blinding.  What do I do?
9. Why won’t my press build a good filter cake?
10. Why are there solids in my filtrate?
11. I have an old filter press.  Is there anything I can do to improve its performance?
12. What is the cost for you to perform a filter press test in your Lab?

OPERATION
13. How many more plates can I add to my press?
14. How many plates can I take out of my press?
15. How do I adjust my hydraulic closing pressure on my press?
16. Can I feed at 125 psi on my 100 psi press?
17. What is the flow rate I can get through my press?
18. What flow rate do I need to precoat my filter press?
19. How do I precoat my press?
20. Why are my sidebars bowing?
21. Why is my press squirting out from between the plates during feed?
22. Why won’t my press build/hold hydraulic pressure?
23. Why is my press leaking hydraulic oil?

MAINTENANCE
24. How can I tell when my filter cloths are dirty?
25. How do I clean my filter cloths?
26. How long do cloths last?
27. How do I change my cloths?
28. How do I change my end plate cloth?
29. When should I change my gaskets?
30. How do I change my gaskets?
31. How do I change my center feed pipe assembly?
32. How often should I change the oil in my hydraulic system?
33. How often should I change the hydraulic filter?
34. I don’t have (or I lost) my Operation & Maintenance manual.  Can I purchase another one?
35. Where do I find the serial number on my filter press?

PROCESS

1. How long will it take to fill my filter press/how long should the cycle time be on my filter press?
This can vary greatly depending on your process and application.  It can be anywhere from 10 minutes to 10 hours or more.  We can do a test to determine the answer for your specific application.  For a quote on testing, we require a completed data form.  Call us at 800.245.3006 to request a quote and the data form.

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2. What’s the best filter cloth for my process?
This depends on your process.  Cloth selection is as much an art as it is a science.  Based on our 1,000 years of combined experience and lab testing, we can make an expert recommendation to you. 

We supply cloths based on criteria you give us and based on sample processing we do in our lab.  Should your process change, we recommend that your cloth type be evaluated for suitability. 

Following is general information to help you understand cloths and how they work.  For detailed questions, call our customer service department at 800.245.3006.

Cloths for non-gasketed plates are hung over the plate, extending from top to bottom, and are held in place by eyelets that fit over the cloth-pins on top of the plates.  With the non-gasketed plate, the filter cloth provides the seal between the plates.  Leakage will occur during operation even though USFilter supplies the non-gasketed plate cloths with latex edging.  The latex will cut down the wicking action somewhat, but will not eliminate it. 

The gasketed plate allows less leakage than the non-gasketed plate due to an o-ring seal around the chamber and filtration ports.  The gasketed cloth has a high-density sash cord sewn around the cloth's perimeter that is caulked into a groove on the plate.

The type of cloth used is determined by the type of process or application performed by the filter press, the operating environment, and the performance required by the filtering media (filter cloths).

The filter cloths come in many different materials including polypropylene, polyester, cotton, and other synthetic materials.  The cloths are made from monofilament fibers, multifilament fibers, or spun fibers.  The smooth surface characteristic of monofilament fibers can help to improve cake release properties.  The uniform circumference of monofilaments also enables fabrics to be produced with consistent pore sizes.  Multifilament and spun fibers are produced by twisting several smaller diameter monofilament fibers together into a single strand.  They are used to produce fabrics that require a very tight weave and fabrics where high flow rates are not critical.

Filter cloths also come in many different styles of fabric weave.

Mesh opening or pore size is also an important consideration when selecting the proper filter cloths for a particular application.  The mesh opening or pore size is determined by the number of fibers, size of the fiber, and the type of weave.  These factors in turn govern flow rates, particle retention, and the strength of the fabric itself.  As shown below, these two fabrics, having the same type of open area, will have similar flow rates, but the fabric on the left will retain finer particles.

different fabric weaves

The cloths can also be finished in several ways:

  • Heat set
  • Scoured
  • Calendared
  • Single-glazed
  • Double-glazed

The filter cloth is the initial barrier that separates the solids from the liquid; therefore, the filter cloth must remain porous to provide high filtration rates.

For more information on how filter cloths function in the filter press, click here:  What is a Filter Press.

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3. How can I tell what kind of cloth I have?
This is difficult to determine from just looking at your filter cloth.  Fortunately, we keep extensive records in our database and will be able to help you with this.  Call us with your serial number at 800.245.3006.

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4. What micron size are my filter cloths?
There is no micron rating on filter cloths.  They are rated by air permeability.

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5. What size feed pump do I need for my press?
It depends on your process, but general guidelines are as follows:

  • Up to 5 cu. ft.  1” air operated diaphragm pump
  • 5 to 15 cu. ft.  1½“ air operated diaphragm pump
  • 15 to 25 cu. ft.  2” air operated diaphragm pump
  • 25 to 50 cu. ft.  3” air operated diaphragm pump
  • 50 cu. ft. and above multiple pumps

We furnish a full line of feed pumps.  Please call our customer service department at 800.245.3006 for your best sizing and price.

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6. How do I size my compressor for my press feed pump and air blow?
It depends on your process, but general guidelines are as follows:

  • A 1” pump should have a 5 hp compressor.
  • A 1½” pump should have a 10 hp compressor.
  • A 2” pump should have a 12-15 hp compressor.
  • A 3” pump should have a 20 hp compressor.

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7. I changed polymer (or chemical treatment type) and now I get sloppy cakes.  What do I do?
Changes in chemical and physical treatment may alter the performance of your filter press.  We can assist you in optimizing your press performance by performing lab testing.  Please call our customer service department at 800.245.3006.

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8. My press is dropping sloppy cakes and I think that my cloths are blinding.  What do I do?
This usually means it is time to clean your filter cloths.

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9. Why won’t my press build a good filter cake?
Possible causes are:

  1. Dirty filter cloths.  What to do:  Clean or replace filter cloths.
  2. Malfunctioning (low) feed pump.   What to do:  Clean and adjust as needed.
  3. Incorrect treatment or treatment change.  What to do:  Contact customer service at 800.245.3006.

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10. Why are there solids in my filtrate?
Possible causes are:

  1. Incorrect filter cloths for your application.  What to do:  Contact customer service at 800.245.3006.
  2. Holes in your filter cloth.  What to do:  Replace filter cloths.
  3. Gasketed cloth out of the grooves.  What to do:  Clean groove and drainage surface behind cloth and reinstall.
  4. Cloth on head plate not properly retained.  What to do:  Replace cloth on head plate.
  5. Change in feed characteristics.  What to do:  Contact customer service at 800.245.3006.

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11. I have an old filter press.  Is there anything I can do to improve its performance?
Yes, there are many things we can do that will improve the performance of your filter press.  Some examples are:

  • Install new filter cloths.
  • Solve problems that may be keeping your filter press from top performance.
  • Make adjustments for changes in your process or treatment chemicals.
  • Expand your filter press.
  • Rebuild or refurbish your filter press.

To find out what we can do for your filter press, call our customer service department at 800.245.3006.

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12. What is the cost for you to perform a filter press test in your Lab?
The average cost of initial feasibility testing is $250-$500 per sample.  Upon request, we can provide you with a quote for your particular testing needs.  We require a completed data form.  Call us at 800.245.3006 to request a quote and the data form.

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OPERATION

13. How many more plates can I add to my press?
 It depends on:

  • The amount of opening space left in your press.
  • How much clean-out space you want to sacrifice.
  • If your press has an expansion piece.

You may be able to buy new, longer sidebars if you have a bolt-on style press.  Call customer service at 800.245.3006.

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14. How many plates can I take out of my press?
Safely, none.  We can provide you with a back-up plate if you need to reduce the capacity of your press.  Call customer service at 800.245.3006.

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15. How do I adjust my hydraulic closing pressure on my press?
It depends on the age and model of your hydraulic system.  Consult your O&M manual or call customer service at 800.245.3006.

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16. Can I feed at 125 psi on my 100 psi press?
NO!  If you have a 100 psi press, it is designed for 100 psi only.  Over-pressurization could cause leakage or catastrophic damage to filter plates and the hydraulic system.  Higher pressure skeletons are available if you need one.  For details, call 800.245.3006.

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17. What is the flow rate I can get through my press?
It depends on your process but averages between 0.02 and 0.1 gallons per minute per square foot of filtration area.  The flow rate is not constant.

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18. What flow rate do I need to precoat my filter press?
A general rule of thumb is 0.25 gallons per minute per square foot of filtration area.

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19. How do I precoat my press?
Precoat and bodyfeed are two related applications.  Both of these special applications use diatomaceous earth (commonly known as D.E.), cellulose, perlite or fly ash, as a filtering aid when the solids in a slurry are extremely fine and free-filtering.  The filtering aid helps to trap the fine solids that otherwise might flow through the filter cloths.  The processes of precoat and bodyfeed increase the clarity of the filtrate, provide for higher flow rates, more consistent runs, shorter cycles, dryer cakes, better cake release, and also help to protect and increase the life of the filter cloths.

The precoat process is performed before the slurry is pumped to the press.  The filter aid, mixed with water and held in a separate tank, is pumped into the press where it coats the filter cloths.  The filter aid rather than the filter cloths becomes your initial filter media.

Requirements:  The filter aid requirements for the precoat process are as follows:

  • Dosage rate of 0.1 lbs/square ft. filtration area.
  • Precoat feed rate of 0.25 to 0.5 gal/min./square ft. filtration area.
  • Precoat tank size – approximately 1.5 times the holding capacity of the filter press.
  • Press discharge manifold should be “even-fill” type.

Method:

  1. Start precoat feed pump.
  2. Turn off precoat pump as soon as the tank runs clear.
  3. Start your slurry feed pump or switch over valves on slurry and precoat lines immediately to prevent a pressure drop.  Flow must not be interrupted or the precoat will fall to the bottom of the chamber.
  4. Complete your filtration cycle.

Caution:  Do not interrupt the flow to the filter press at any time during the precoat or during the feed cycle.

Bodyfeed works in much the same manner as precoat.  Bodyfeed, however, takes place throughout the entire filtration cycle.  Again, the filter aid is held in a separate tank, but instead of pumping it through the press prior to filtration, the filter aid is metered into the slurry line.

Please call our customer service department at 800.245.3006 for sizing for your specific application.

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20. Why are my sidebars bowing?
This usually means you have solids build-up on your sealing surfaces.  If so, clean your plates and cloths. 

In rare instances, it may be due to incorrect press installation alignment.  Consult your O&M manual for installation and set-up instructions or call our customer service department at 800.245.3006.

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21. Why is my press squirting out from between the plates during feed?
Have you made any recent changes to the plate stack that could be causing this?  If not, possible causes are:

  1. Solids build-up on sealing surfaces.  What to do:  Use nylon cleaning spatula to remove cake from sealing surface.
  2. The hydraulic pressure is not to recommended specifications.  What to do:  Adjust to required pressure.
  3. The feed pressure is too high.  What to do:  Adjust to required pressure.
  4. There is a wrinkle or hole in the filter cloth.  What to do:  Replace the filter cloth.
  5. If you have gasketed plates, your gaskets may be loose or torn.  What to do:  Reinstall or replace gaskets.

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22. Why won’t my press build/hold hydraulic pressure?
Possible causes are:

  1. Faulty check valve.  What to do:  Remove Check Valve (CV), view inside the end of the valve for any obvious debris and push on the Check Valve to make sure that it moves smoothly.  The Check Valve should move inward approximately 0.125”.  Check o-rings for wear.
  2. Improperly set/faulty Relief Valve.  What to do:  Ensure the Relief Valve (RV) is set properly (refer to your O&M manual).  Remove Relief Valve and visually inspect o-rings for wear and for debris that may cause the valve to stick slightly open.
  3. OPEN/CLOSE/PUMP Selector Switch is bad.  What to do:  With air supply “OFF”, remove Blue Line from back side of Selector Switch, turn switch to “PUMP”.  Turn air supply “ON”.  If air bleeds out where the Blue Line was connected, then replace switch.

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23. Why is my press leaking hydraulic oil?
Possible causes are:

  1. Overfilled Hydraulic Reservoir.  What to do:  Inspect Hydraulic Reservoir sight gauge with cylinder COMPLETELY extended and add or drain necessary oil.
  2. Faulty Hydraulic Cylinder.  What to do:  Contact customer service at 800.245.3006.

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MAINTENANCE

24. How can I tell when my filter cloths are dirty?
Usually you will need a longer cycle time to achieve the same cake dryness.  You may also notice sloppy cake or discharge flow is less.

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25. How do I clean my filter cloths?
Use a spatula to scrape cake off the surface.  Cake buildup can cause bending of the press frame.  Excessive bending can lead to equipment failure!  Keep the cloths and plates as clean as possible, especially along the sealing surface.  Keep the following in mind when scraping cloths:

  • Use care not to cut or rip the cloth.
  • Cloths deteriorate over time and become more fragile and susceptible to tearing.
  • Make sure the edge of the spatula is smooth.
  • Do not tap the spatula on hard objects to remove cake from the spatula surface.  This may form dents or tears in the spatula surface that can tear cloths.

Lodged particles must be removed periodically to maintain high filtration rates and dry cakes.  A high-pressure, cold water, spray unit with a capacity of 800-1200 psi (55-80 bar) and 2-10 gpm (8-38 lpm) should have sufficient capacity.  A broad spray nozzle should be used at a safe distance.  If the pattern is too intense at a close distance, the cloth weave may be forced apart, leaving openings that allow sludge.  Call our customer service at 800.245.3006 for information on availability of these units if you do not have one.

If high-pressure washing does not improve performance, carefully pull back a corner of the filter cloth and check the drainage area and discharge parts of the plate for solids buildup.  If there is any buildup, the cloths must be removed, and the plates and cloth backs cleaned.  Excessive buildup causes slow filtration cycles and can lead to plate breakage.

If more thorough cleaning is required, you can use a chemical process to dissolve the entrapped particulate. 

A recirculation cleaning method using a particulate dissolving solution is the most effective cloth cleaning method.  This method circulates an acid, caustic, or cleaning solution through the press to dissolve built up particulate.  The type of solution depends on the slurry.  Contact our customer service at 800.245.3006 if you need assistance determining the appropriate solution.

Be extremely careful when handling acids or caustics!  Eye protection and protective clothing is required.  Should you get acid or caustic in your eyes or on your skin, rinse with water immediately and seek medical attention if necessary.  Notify your supervisor of the incident.

Do not acid or caustic wash non-gasketed filter plates unless extra precautions are taken to contain the leakage between plates.

Consult the chemical compatibility chart in the safety section of your O&M manual to ensure safe and proper operation of the press.

Setup & Requirements

  • Storage tank of sufficient capacity to fill the press and allow for recirculation- approximately 1.5 times the holding capacity of the press.
  • A low-pressure (20-30 psi [1.4-2.1 bar]) pump.
  • Necessary plumbing (hoses or rigid PVC pipe) to isolate the press from the sludge stream and allow for both recirculation to the storage tank and final draining of the spent solution.  A throttling valve installed in the return line to the tank may be necessary to ensure complete top to bottom press filling and washing of the cloths.

Procedure

  1. Clean filter cloths of all external material with a nylon cleaning spatulas.
  2. Close the press.
  3. Disconnect the center feed line from the sludge pump.
  4. Connect the outlet of the acid pump to the center feed line of the press.
  5. Connect the filtrate discharge outlet of the press to the recirculation tank.
  6. Open the feed line to the press.
  7. Start the feed pump.  It may take considerable time to fill all the chambers of the press before the solution returns to the storage tank.  Continually inspect the press for leakage during filling and circulation.
  8. Allow the solution to circulate for one to two hours.
  9. Turn off the feed pump.
  10. Perform an air blowdown to purge any remaining solution from the press.
  11. Disconnect the wash system and reinstall the sludge pump and outlet lines.
  12. Normal filtration cycles can now be performed.

The plates can also be "dip washed" by immersing them in a tank of solution.  The immersion method is less efficient than through-washing in the press and will require a longer soak time.  The plates will also float and require some method to keep them submerged.

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26. How long do cloths last?
They could last as little as six months or as long as five years.  It depends on many things:

  • Your process.
  • How often you run your filter press.
  • What you run through your filter press.
  • How well you maintain your filter cloths.

It’s probably time to change your cloths when you see abrasion, stretchiness, folding, holes, poor cake, dirty filtrate or when conventional cleaning techniques don’t restore the performance of your filter press.

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27. How do I change my cloths?
First, remove the used filter cloth.  To remove a filter cloth from a gasketed plate, insert a thin bladed screw driver into the groove at the outer edge of the caulking and pry out a small section of the cloth.  Grab the sash cord caulking with a vise grip pliers and pull the remaining cloth out of the caulking groove.  Do this on both sides of the plate.  Pull the cloth through the center feed eye of the plate.  After the cloth is removed, inspect and remove any accumulated solids from the groove before inserting the new cloth.

removing gasketed cloth

To remove a filter cloth from a non-gasketed plate, use diagonal cutters or snips to cut the ties (if supplied) on the vertical sides and lift each side of the cloth off of the cloth-pins on the top edge of the plate.  Pull the cloth through the center feed eye of the plate.

Installing:  On both gasketed and non-gasketed plates having a center feed eye with sewn centers, you will need to fold the cloth on one side into a small section so that it can be inserted through the center feed eye.  Once you pull the cloth through the eye, unfold it for caulking on the gasketed plate, or hanging on the non-gasketed plate.

INSERT PICTURE

On gasketed plates, place the cloth against the plate and tap in a small section of the sash cord or O-ring on the top to hold the cloth in position.  Line up and caulk the diagonal sections first to ensure proper alignment of the cloth.  Distribute the caulking one the sides, top and bottom by caulking in the center of these long sections first.  Proceed to insert the balance of the caulking, ensuring that the caulking is distributed evenly.  Even though there may appear to be a surplus of material, this can be worked in easily.

installing retaining material

The tool for installing the retaining material (o-ring caulking and sash cords) is a simple wedge of polypropylene or some other non-shattering type material.  The recommended size for the tool is 1” (25mm) thick x 3” (75mm) wide x 8” (200mm) long with one end tapered down to 5/16” (8mm) thick (available from USFilter, part #10583800).  CAUTION:  Do not use a metal wedge since this may damage the cord or filter cloth.

On non-gasketed, lift the cloth over the cloth dogs on top of the plate.  Then join the two edges on the sides of the filter plate with wire ties or similar clips.

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28. How do I change my end plate cloth?
Unlike intermediate filter cloths, the end-plate (head and tail) cloths do not have a sewn-in centerfeed eye.  The end-plate cloths would be installed as described in the previous question; however, the head-plate cloth must have the centerfeed hold cut before installation. 

To do this, remove the old head cloth by first removing the centerfeed assembly’s clip nut.  Then, tap the corners of the new end-cloth into the head-plate making sure it is positioned correctly.  Cut out the cloth around the centerfeed pipe using the equivalent of a hot knife, sottering gun or the like.  This will seal the edges of the cut to prevent possible fraying of threads in the cloth.  After the hole has been cut, finish installing the head cloth, then re-attach the clip nut.

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29. When should I change my gaskets?
It’s a good idea to change your gaskets whenever you change your filter cloths.  Also, if you are getting excessive leakage out of the press while maintaining correct hydraulic closure pressure, this may be a sign that it is time to change your gaskets.

Gasket life will depend on many factors, such as length of filtration cycle, temperature, and excessive closing force.  Gasket replacement should take place if the gasket appears to be delaminating or shredding into small particles.  Also, if excessive temperatures exist and cycles are very long, the Nordel elastomer (standard gasket material) may go into additional cure, causing it to harden slightly.  If the gasket life of the Nordel elastomer is unsatisfactory, contact USFilter for a suitable replacement.

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30. How do I change my gaskets?
1.  Insert the gasket starting at the bottom center of the filter plate using a wood or plastic mallet.  Push the gasket into the groove around the outer edge of the plate until it mates at the center of the plate.  Many installers will incorrectly stretch the gasket material. This reduces the cross section, making it easier to insert.  However, by stretching the gasket material for easier installation, it has a tendency to creep and open the butted joint of the gasket, causing a leak. 

changing gasket material

2.  Cut the gasket approximately 1/2" (12mm) to 1" (25mm) longer than required, cutting the end squarely. 

3.  Apply one or two drops of Eastman 910 (or equivalent "super glue") to one end of the gasket and quickly join it to the other end.  Hold it under hand pressure for approximately 30 seconds.  Then crowd the excess gasket into the groove to ensure fullness of gasket material.

Install the discharge eye gaskets in the same manner.

NOTE:  When gasketed plates are first put into use, the new gasket material may be slightly sticky or gummy and cause gaskets to pull out of the grooves when plates are separated.  This condition is eliminated as product film is built up.  If any gaskets show this characteristic, apply a silicone spray until the press has been used several times.

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31. How do I change my center feed pipe assembly?
If the press is leaking (around the locknut on the 470mm size or from the bottom leg drain holes on 630mm and larger size presses) during the start-up of the feed process, the problem is usually leakage past the center feed quad ring seal. The quad ring may not seal for several reasons. 

First check for the cause:

Did the locknut on the outside of the press head loosen during shipment?  If so, tighten the locknut using a spanner wrench, pliers, or pipe wrench.

  • Was extra field piping and/or manifolding added to the center feed pipe without proper support?  Unsupported loads on the center feed pipe can cause the pipe to move off axis and unload the quad seal on one side.  If this is the case, properly support all external piping.  Loosen the piping from the factory-supplied piping and/or valve and realign the feed pipe so that it is perpendicular to the plate surface.  Tighten the locknut and reinstall the supported piping.
  • Was the center feed pipe rotated during the field installation of extra piping/ manifolding?  This could unseat the quad seal causing leakage around the seal.  No feed pipe movement will reseat it. 

To fix it, follow these steps:

  1. Open the press and shift all of the plates to the open position (toward the cylinder head).  The inside surface of the head plate will have a centrally located clip nut approximately 0.5" (13mm) thick that retains the filter cloth on the clip nut seat.  This clip nut should be removed with a spanner wrench or pliers.
  2. If the press has non-gasketed plates, lift the cloth off the top cloth pins. If the press has gasketed plates, the cloth must be removed from the caulking groove so that the top 2/3 can be peeled down to expose the center feed and allow the movement of the center feed pipe.
  3. Loosen the locknut and back it off 2 to 3 inches (50 mm to 75 mm).  Carefully push the center feed pipe out of its counterbore in the head plate.  This allows access to the quad seal and its mounting land.  Reinstall the seal onto the land.  A few small drops of super glue may be applied to help retain the seal.
  4. Reinstall the liner pipe into its counterbore and tighten the locknut making sure that the pipe remains perpendicular to the plate.
  5. Reinstall the filter cloth

center feed pipe assembly

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32. How often should I change the oil in my hydraulic system?
Under normal conditions, you should usually change your hydraulic oil once a year, or every 2,000 operating hours.  Under severe conditions, the oil will need to be changed more frequently.  The following chart is a guideline for maintenance of your hydraulic power unit:

Item

Frequency

Procedure

Clamp Pressure Daily Check for correct clamp pressure.
Relief Valve Quarterly Check for proper setting.
Oil Level Weekly Check for proper level.
Oil Filter Monthly Inspect and/or clean.
Oil Filter Yearly Replace.
Hydraulic Oil Yearly Replace.

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33. How often should I change the hydraulic filter?
Whenever you change your oil, you should change your filter.

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34. I don’t have (or I lost) my Operation & Maintenance manual.  Can I purchase another one?
Yes.  Call customer service at 800.245.3006 to purchase replacement or additional O&M manuals for your filter press.  Please have your serial number ready.

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35. Where do I find the serial number on my filter press?
If you have an Evoqua, Siemens, USFilter or JWI press, you can find the serial number on the index page of your owner’s manual.  Also, look for the serial tag on your filter press.  It is usually located inside the hydraulic cabinet door.

If you have a Perrin filter press, the serial number is sometimes stamped on the sidebars of the press.

If you still can’t find the serial number, give us a call at 800.245.3006.  We can search our extensive database for your serial number.  To help us find it, please have as much of the following information as you can ready:

  • Your company name.
  • The name of the original owner of the filter press.
  • The age of your filter press.
  • The size of your filter press.
  • The model number of your filter press.

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For further assistance and cloths, plates and all your parts needs, call our customer service department at 800.245.3006 or e-mail us at dewatering.water@siemens.com.  Thank you.